Taipei Metro Installation Focuses On the Hidden Beauty Of First Encounters

During morning commutes, the occasional unintentional staring contest is bound to happen. Subway passengers will, at one point or another, lock eyes—it’s human nature. Though you can try to avoid such iris encounters, one metro station in Taipei is guaranteeing that passers-by will get gazed at, thanks to a project by multimedia artist Hsin-Chien Huang. Titled The Moment We Meetthe three-part installation focuses on the first encounters that spice up (for better or worse) the dreary cycle of endless commuting.

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(Source: Vice Magazine)

360° Panorama Timelapse Of A Bike Cruise Is The Chillest Thing You’ll See All Day

It’s just about bike cruising season, and German photographer Jonas Ginter is getting us stoked to hop on a ten-speed and coast all day with his awesome 360° timelapse video. The one-minute clip morphs a simple bike path into a panoramic, spherical world that makes the guy look as if he’s gliding on the very tip of a mini-planet. The hip-hop beats in the background only make this ride even more relaxed, man. 

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(Source: Vice Magazine)

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"SKIN" Transforms Your Emotions Into Sound And Color Through Sweat Data

Harvest Works gallery in New York exhibited an installation by audiovisual artist, Claudia Robles, that gets under your skin… literally. SKIN is a project that measures gallery visitors’ skin moisture using a GSR (Galvanic Skin Response) interface and transforms that data into sound and images. Psychological states such as stress, nervousness, and even arousal become observable, external information. Be careful who you test it out around. 
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"I’m interested in making the human body visual and audible," Robles told The Creators Project. "We normally don’t hear or perceive our body, and this work is a way of making us aware of it and to enhance its potential as a visual and musical instrument." With this exhibition, people can affect the video, sound, and overall environment of a gallery space purely based on their own emotional states.
The artist originally premiered a similar installation in 2012, but Harvest Works contacted her and said they had a new audio system with eight channels and three video projectors, prompting her to upgrade the project. “My work is immersive, and [Harvest Work’s set-up] has really great conditions for a piece like this,” she said. 

SKIN implements a commercial interface called GSR 2 that’s usually used as a biofeedback interface that helps anxious people learn to calm down. The interface measures the skin’s moisture and the data is turned into frequencies and colors using MAX software. Low frequencies and blue color represent a relaxed state, while orange images and higher frequencies indicate a higher degree of stress. In certain respects, the project works like a high-tech mood ring. 
"In the installation, people experience mostly red colors and high frequencies because the space is publicly reflecting their inner states," explained Robles. "When they see the first blue line, and as the blue line gets bigger, people realize they are calming down." The artist added that people are very anxious and impatient when wearing the GSR—"They want to get calm in just a few minutes!" But the installation is not meant to calm people down, it is simply a method for visually and sonically articulating their inner states. "If they take time to get calm, they experience a calm [atmosphere]… but it takes time." 
Though it sounds nerve-wracking to have your internal, private feelings projected to a group of strangers in an art gallery, Robles work is fascinating in that one person’s emotional barometer can change the mood and environment of a big space—a chance to become Zeus, of sorts, in Chelsea. And in case you were wondering: sweatier people don’t yield stronger reactions from the system. But for the neurotic, this is an opportunity to have your friends see and hear how you feel on the inside. 
See some photos of the exhibition below, and visit Harvest Work’s website for more information. 
Images by Emilio Vavarella. Visit Claudia Robles’ website for more on her awesome work: http://www.claudearobles.de/
source: http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/skin-transforms-your-emotions-into-sound-a-color-through-sweat-data

"SKIN" Transforms Your Emotions Into Sound And Color Through Sweat Data

Harvest Works gallery in New York exhibited an installation by audiovisual artist, Claudia Robles, that gets under your skin… literally. SKIN is a project that measures gallery visitors’ skin moisture using a GSR (Galvanic Skin Response) interface and transforms that data into sound and images. Psychological states such as stress, nervousness, and even arousal become observable, external information. Be careful who you test it out around. 

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Interactive Exploration of a Dynamical System

A user interface for exploring systems of differential equations. Every variable is shown as a plot; every parameter has a knob that can be adjusted in realtime. This ubiquitous visualization and in-context-manipulation helps the user develop a sense for how the parameters of the system influence its behavior.

Part of the Kill Math project: worrydream.com/KillMath

By Bret Victor: worrydream.com

Lenscape by  Kine Solberg

Kine Solberg’s window panels made with lenses create distorted views

Graduate designer Kine Solberg has created window panels from circularglass lenses that manipulate images of the landscape reflected across their surfaces (+ slideshow).

Solberg aimed to optimise the amount of light entering through a glass surface, so formed the panels from a series of rotating lenses that also distort the view through their surface.

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Reading Ulysses with… your fingers.
He Liked Thick Word Soup – Software experiment about text, space and time
Created by Tel-Aviv based designer and programmer Ariel Malka, He Liked Thick Word Soup is the latest experiment in the Chronotext series, a growing collection of software experiments exploring the relation between text, space and time.
While some apps claim to increase your reading speed, He Liked Thick Word Soup does the opposite, forces you to read with your fingers. Through 4 episodes of increasing difficulty, your challenge is to wrestle with the text of James Joyce’s monumental work Ulysses, both mentally and physically. By the end, you will have read up to four pages and 100 sentences chosen from throughout the novel.

Your fingers’ dexterity will have increased by an exponential factor, and your point of view on Modernist literature and experimental apps will have changed forever.

The app plays differently depending on whether played on a phone or a tablet. Ariel and the team recommend experiencing both versions. The apps, available both for iOS and Android were made with Cinder and the new-chronotext-toolkit available on GitHub.
Project Page | Chronotext | AppStore (Free) | Google Play (Free)

Reading Ulysses with… your fingers.

He Liked Thick Word Soup – Software experiment about text, space and time

Created by Tel-Aviv based designer and programmer Ariel Malka, He Liked Thick Word Soup is the latest experiment in the Chronotext series, a growing collection of software experiments exploring the relation between text, space and time.

While some apps claim to increase your reading speed, He Liked Thick Word Soup does the opposite, forces you to read with your fingers. Through 4 episodes of increasing difficulty, your challenge is to wrestle with the text of James Joyce’s monumental work Ulysses, both mentally and physically. By the end, you will have read up to four pages and 100 sentences chosen from throughout the novel.

Your fingers’ dexterity will have increased by an exponential factor, and your point of view on Modernist literature and experimental apps will have changed forever.

The app plays differently depending on whether played on a phone or a tablet. Ariel and the team recommend experiencing both versions. The apps, available both for iOS and Android were made with Cinder and the new-chronotext-toolkit available on GitHub.

Project Page Chronotext | AppStore (Free) | Google Play (Free)

‘Flutter’ is a new interactive artwork by Dominic Harris of Cinimod Studio that explores the viewer’s encounter with a rabble of virtual butterflies. Set within a striking architectural framework and making use of cutting edge technologies developed with White Wing Logic engineers, the artwork is a product of our on-going fascination with the motion of a butterfly’s flight and the iridescent reflections and scattering of light by the scales on a butterfly’s wing.

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Discovery Wall – Screen made from thousands of iPod Nanos

Created by London-based creative agencies Squint/Opera and Hirsch&Mann, Discovery Wall is a wall-sized installation created from thousands of tiny screens and lenses that celebrates the work of the new $650m Belfer Research Building, part of Weill Cornell Medical College (WCMC) in Manhattan.

The installation (approx 4.6m x 2.7m) is comprised of 2800 mini screens set in a grid pattern behind a panel of thousands of circular acrylic discs. The dual layer construction makes it possible to read the wall from a distance as a single image, and then, up close, each screen has information about medical discoveries and other news from WCMC’s website.

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Jared Tarbell and his works

Gallary of Computation

about programmer:

Jared Tarbell is one part Magical Mystery Tour (Lennon/McCartney), one partBrandenburg Concerto (J.S. Bach), and one part Somnium (Robert Rich).

Born in 1973 to William and Suzon Davis Tarbell in the high altitude desert city of Albuquerque, New Mexico, he was first introduced to personal computers in 1987. Jared’s interest in computation has grown in direct relation to the processing power of these machines.

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transmediatic:

[NEW BOOK]
Transmedia 2.0: How To Create An Entertainment Brand using a Transmedia Approach to Storytelling by Nuno Bernardo
“Every producer aspires to design an entertainment brand that can grow into a pop icon, a brand whose storyworld or hero has enough creative potential to power spin-offs and reboots, theme park rides and acres of merchandise. So how can independents achieve this degree of success if they don’t have a hundred million dollars to spend on a marketing campaign or the time to gamble on a viral video or game? 
In “Transmedia 2.0: How to Create an Entertainment Brand Using a Transmedial Approach To Storytelling”, Nuno Bernardo will show readers how to use the transmedia approach to build an entertainment brand that can conquer global audiences, readers and users in a myriad of platforms. “Transmedia 2.0” is the follow up to the 2011 bestseller “The Producers Guide to Transmedia” and draws on Nuno Bernardo’s experience of multi-platform storytelling and production. Inspired by Orson Welles radio play “War of the Worlds”, Nuno has being exploring new forms of interactive and immersive storytelling for the past decade. Using his unique approach to transmedia, Nuno has produced more than 200 hours of multi-platform content; from feature films and TV shows to mobile apps and books”.
Find more

transmediatic:

[NEW BOOK]

Transmedia 2.0: How To Create An Entertainment Brand using a Transmedia Approach to Storytelling by Nuno Bernardo

Every producer aspires to design an entertainment brand that can grow into a pop icon, a brand whose storyworld or hero has enough creative potential to power spin-offs and reboots, theme park rides and acres of merchandise. So how can independents achieve this degree of success if they don’t have a hundred million dollars to spend on a marketing campaign or the time to gamble on a viral video or game? 


In “Transmedia 2.0: How to Create an Entertainment Brand Using a Transmedial Approach To Storytelling”, Nuno Bernardo will show readers how to use the transmedia approach to build an entertainment brand that can conquer global audiences, readers and users in a myriad of platforms. “Transmedia 2.0” is the follow up to the 2011 bestseller “The Producers Guide to Transmedia” and draws on Nuno Bernardo’s experience of multi-platform storytelling and production. Inspired by Orson Welles radio play “War of the Worlds”, Nuno has being exploring new forms of interactive and immersive storytelling for the past decade. Using his unique approach to transmedia, Nuno has produced more than 200 hours of multi-platform content; from feature films and TV shows to mobile apps and books”.

Find more